E3 (The Electronic Entertainment Expo) is right around the corner, and for those in the dark, that means video game news. Lots of video game news. June 14-16 marks the 21st E3 showcase, and while the expo has recently lost several high-profile participants, it remains an important platform for companies like Microsoft, Nintendo, Sony, and many more third-party developers.

Some of the biggest gaming announcements of all time have been made at E3, but the manner in which the public receives those has changed. When the Sony PlayStation was announced at the first expo in 1995, it was primarily to print journalists. Over the years, the show evolved with Internet journalism, and onto mainstream television. Today, bloggers, wiki, and fansite managers are sometimes extended invitations to spread the news.

Polygon reports that YouTube will be returning for its second year to host its own E3 show. Coverage starts Sunday, June 12th, with representatives from Rooster Teeth reporting on the pre-expo conferences from developers Bethesda and EA. On Monday, ex-G4 commentator Geoff Keighley picks up the reins for a 12-hour stream of the Microsoft, Ubisoft, Sony, and Nintendo announcements. The stream starts at 9 a.m. PST and promises “developer interviews, gameplay and surprise guests.” The Gaming section of YouTube will continue to provide additional coverage though the week of the main event.

e3 header overlay latest YouTube Will Host a Live E3 2016 Show


In a year when E3 is again struggling to assert its value at the forefront of gaming news, having a centralized stage on the world’s largest video-sharing provider can’t hurt. But whether a streamlined platform is enough to bring developers back to the show floor is yet to be seen. As the game industry has grown, it has become more and more difficult for any particular vendor to stand out by reaching gamers directly at the E3 venue. This year, Activision seems to have given up entirely on courting visitors in a floor booth, instead focusing on private events like their Call of Duty Championship. While news like this is of some concern it’s important to remember that convention attendance has been in a state of flux for some time. Nintendo similarly limited their presence in 2013 and 2014, but have since returned to the fold.

It’s possible that one event is no longer big enough to represent all of gaming, but for players who can’t make it to the increasingly crowded expo, it’s good to know that those interested will be able to follow along at home. As the world has become more interconnected, the need to fit an industry’s entire audience in one hall has lessened. Perhaps, then, it is only a matter of time before gamers are allowed access to live streaming demos of upcoming games during the week of E3.

Screen Rant will have more details on all the news from E3 as it is made available.

Source: Polygon, YouTube, GameSlice