Comments on: Spoiler Alert: Is Franchise Filmmaking Killing Dramatic Tension? http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=spoiler-alert-dramatic-tension-franchise-filmmaking The #1 Independent Movie & TV News Website Thu, 29 Jan 2015 12:18:03 +0000 hourly 1 By: Chris http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-2/#comment-874506 Tue, 24 Sep 2013 04:42:44 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-874506 It isnt killing dramatic tension its just taking longer to build it up. The end result just needs to be executed to a unforgivable level.

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By: Perhaps http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-2/#comment-874231 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 21:59:41 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-874231 I strongly disagree with the premise of your article, Chris. I don’t think that knowing that there are three more sequels planned takes away from dramatic tension. I think that is was obvious to most people that Spider Man and Dom would not be killed. My enjoyment of the next installments will not be diminished at all since it’s unlikely that they’ll be killed. As others have opined, I think that trailers that show too much of a given movie kill dramatic license much more.

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By: Pyronaut http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-2/#comment-874215 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 21:43:53 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-874215 Sadly, this is very true.

I read an interview with a film maker recently that said that film studios are a bunch of bankers, and the film makers are artists, and it’s a struggle between the two to get films made.

It’s unfortunate when they take a risk and make a film like Could Atlas, which tanks, and it’s just more reason for them to studios to reboots/remakes and franchise sequels.

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By: Hector http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-2/#comment-874036 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 18:58:07 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-874036 For the studios is money, money, money. As long as they can keep on making it, there will endless sequels or prequels. They will not bother about the plot nor will they try to engage the public.

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By: Slayer http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-2/#comment-874030 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 18:50:26 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-874030 I did not think people went into these franchise movies looking for some deep experience or high art. It would like going to McDonald’s and expecting a gourmet meal…

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By: Jar Jar Thinks http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-1/#comment-873971 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 17:45:09 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-873971 Agree with FlyoverCow. Predictability is not a symptom of franchises. I think the author is kinda meaning ‘Serialization’ which lowers the dramatic stakes. If anything I feel the serialization/franchising allows for bigger, staggered story arcs, so maybe the author feels the film writers are not capitalising on that

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By: reno2200 http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-2/#comment-873943 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 17:25:55 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-873943 Of course not, but I for one didn’t go in 100% certain Kent Sr. was going to die and felt that the way he died was pretty heart-wrenching. Oh yeah, and Zod and the remaining chance for the Kryptonian species to get a second chance. The only things guaranteed going in were, “Doomed planet. Desperate scientists. Last hope. Kindly couple. Superman.”

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By: reno2200 http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-2/#comment-873939 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 17:21:10 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-873939 I get what you’re saying, but Lord of the Rings? Really? It was a film series based on books (so the plot was readily available/obvious) and I’m 90% sure that all three were filmed pretty much back-to-back. Not saying they weren’t great, great films, but it doesn’t really fit into your argument.

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By: Pyronaut http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-2/#comment-873882 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 16:39:48 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-873882 I agree. So many times I see the trailer for a film AFTER watching the film itself, and I’m very glad that I didn’t see the trailer before because it would have ruined many surprises in the movie. Conversely, many a film has been ruined because I saw the trailer beforehand and basically knew what was going to happen. It’s almost as bad as announcing multiple sequels.

For example, in Pacific Rim, there was this tension about Idris Elba’s character actually getting in a Jaeger. Was he actually going to? Yes, of course he was because I saw it in the trailer.

Or take the F&F6 film. The whole “holy crap they have a tank” part, or “holy crap they’re chasing after a plane on the runway and it’s exploding” aspects of the film were ruined in the trailer as well. With a fairly formulaic film such as the F&F series, over the top sequences like these are what make it worth watching, and if you already know it’s going to happen, then it really lessens the experience.

The problem seems to be that the people who make the trailer aren’t the same as the ones who make the film, so oftentimes they just want to show the flashiest parts of the movie in order to get people excited. Unfortunately, when there’s not much else left over, then I’m often left wanting as I walk out of the theatre.

So often these days I find myself looking down in the theatre as trailers for anticipated films come on. I feel silly doing so, but it’s just not worth the lessened experience for me.

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By: Hector http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-2/#comment-873868 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 16:30:16 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-873868 It also depends on the knowledge or type of interest audiences have about a movie. I couldn’t care less about the details of the F&F films. In the end, women and men go to see these type of films to check out the actors or in the case of men; to check the girls wearing maxi-belts (skirts). Some others go because they do like cars.

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By: Vegabomber http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-2/#comment-873748 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 14:53:34 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-873748 I would say that several things contribute to the lack of dramatic tension in most of the current movie releases. The following are a few.

A)Trailers that expose to much; Also too many trailers
B)Lack of sufficient character development
C)Films only made to capitalize on trends
D)Several films borrowing many similar plot devices from each other
E)Lazy production as a whole, e.g. scripting, casting, directing and acting
F)Films that cater heavily to fan service
G)Genre burnout, superhero movies are getting there
H)Movies with big toy tie-ends; Kids don’t care about drama, its about discovery and non-stop action
I)Poor screenplays; Don’t tell me! Show me why I should care!

I found myself walking out of most movies this year saying, ‘Well at least the visuals were amazing.’

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By: Fay http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-2/#comment-873716 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 14:14:53 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-873716 I agree with the critics. It’s not necessary for big franchise productions to lay all their cards on the table. (Ironically, in the case the Fast and Furious franchise, I am more than willing to read their cards.) The thing I find most annoying and illogical is the fact that in the trailers of their major productions, which tend to be action movies, is that the whole movie is displayed in a video of 3 minutes. This doesn’t make any sense and it shows how little the companies care about the audience’s voyage and ultimately their own product. This really needs to be adressed and changed, just for the fun of film making and watching. Bring back the creativity, because trailer can actually be an art in its self and sometimes even masterful.

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By: SamFryer http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-2/#comment-873692 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 13:44:07 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-873692 Actually, the Fast and Furious movies have subverted this with the Han character to a pretty good effect. And realistically, that lack of dramatic tension isn’t exclusive to franchises. Did anyone really think Superman was going to die in Man of Steel?

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By: Anton http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-2/#comment-873636 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 12:04:55 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-873636 I’m okay with both scenarios. For one, I think that it is good that a studio plans ahead in terms of franchises, but I don’t think they need to hype (for example) the third movie when the 2nd movie hasn’t been released yet (i.e. Fast & Furious, The Amazing Spider-Man). I also like the taking a film in a franchise one at a time. It worked so well for The Dark Knight trilogy, the Lord of the Rings trilogy, and several other “trilogies”, because you actually think someone might die at the end of the trilogy, unless your ‘Batman Forever’, ‘The Last Crusade’, Terminator 3′, etc.

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By: Thren http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-1/#comment-873554 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 08:38:14 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-873554 Whoops, I was late to the party, you are saying much the same thing I think, and saying it very well. I very much agree, the best movies can be watched many times.

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By: Thren http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-1/#comment-873547 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 08:22:20 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-873547 I think the adage that ‘it’s not the destination, it’s the journey’ should apply here. With any superhero or standard action movie, most of the time there are some assumptions you can make about the most likely resolution and who will survive. It’s true sometimes these expectations may be played with, but that’s really no different than studios playing with expectations made by casting announcements. They very well -may- be making one movie at a time, but until they have made the next one, it’s safer to have their actors secured weather they are needed for one movie or more. Once they have made the next movie, if they decide to kill off or part ways with a multi-contract character, it’s far easier to let them go than secure them if they need them for a future film.
At any rate, it seems to me that for most movies that identify with any particular genre the audience has to suspend disbelief to invest in the world already, despite knowing what outcomes are standard for the genre. Likewise it is the creators’ job to craft a journey that is rewarding, weather the destination is expected or not.

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By: Flyover Cow http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-1/#comment-873431 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 04:00:48 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-873431 I think the real question this article is asking is whether or not the predictability of a movie’s story effects its ability to engage an audience. While unpredictability can create dramatic tension, I think ultimately it plays only a minor role in the audience’s investment.

Consider the LotR trilogy. Despite retelling a 50 year old story, it’s one of the most engaging blockbuster franchises of the past 15 years. This is because, while its story is well known, it tells that story well. It gets the characters and emotional moments right. Because of this it has great re-watch value.

Unpredictability is a useful tool in a storytellers toolbox, but it’s really just a one time thing. Once you’ve seen a movie, you know how it ends. But if the story is done well, you’ll want to keep coming back to it.

So, does knowing the outcome beforehand hurt dramatic tension? I don’t think it does, at least not for me. Obviously, I avoid spoilers, because it is fun to discover things along with the characters in the movie. In the long run though, predictability doesn’t have much of an effect on my engagement with a franchise.

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By: Exodus http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-1/#comment-873421 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 03:46:03 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-873421 I was really surprised in How To Train You Dragon when the main character lost a leg at the end of the movie. Now I’m going into the next installation knowing anything can happen.

Actually you don’t have to kill off a character to create some tension. Creative writing is all that’s required, even if you announce your actors for the next five films.

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By: Kyle http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-1/#comment-873417 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 03:39:04 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-873417 + like 20 (alteast) for you bro.

Destinations are trivial, what a character does on the journey in-between can be much more important in a story. There can be just as much/more dramatic tension in wondering *how* something might happen than just knowing that it will.

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By: Al http://screenrant.com/dramatic-tension-in-franchise-filmmaking/comment-page-1/#comment-873370 Mon, 23 Sep 2013 02:41:27 +0000 http://screenrant.com/?p=366606#comment-873370 Sorry, been a while since I commented SR! Still love you guys; I listen to your podcast every week!!

Mneah, I dunno. I think this approach works in every situation except comic book movies. I mean, I could be wrong, but don’t most people understand that comic-book heroes and villains never really DIE?? Sure they get banged up a little, but who really expects a comic book hero or villain to DIE?? Where this works is when there is a new story being brought out; situation like that, I’d prefer to not be in the know when it comes to my characters. But, you know, even then, even if you know the outcome of your protagonist, isn’t it more about the development and growth of the character and not the (potentially ultimate) destination??

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