Films about innocent country girls, possessed by demonic forces, aren’t exactly a rarity in Hollywood and judging by the new trailer for director Daniel Stamm’s upcoming horror The Last Exorcism, the devil-girl genre isn’t going anywhere.

Director Eli Roth (Hostel) is producing the film with Lionsgate handling distribution.

The trailer does a decent job of introducing us to the Last Exorcism plot  – though, the film follows a pretty traditional possession story format:

“When he arrives on the rural Louisiana farm of Louis Sweetzer, the Reverend Cotton Marcus expects to perform just another routine “exorcism” on a disturbed religious fanatic. An earnest fundamentalist, Sweetzer has contacted the charismatic preacher as a last resort, certain his teenage daughter Nell is possessed by a demon who must be exorcised before their terrifying ordeal ends in unimaginable tragedy. Buckling under the weight of his conscience after years of parting desperate believers with their money, Cotton and his crew plan to film a confessionary documentary of this, his last exorcism. But upon arriving at the already blood drenched family farm, it is soon clear that nothing could have prepared him for the true evil he encounters there. Now, too late to turn back, Reverend Marcus’ own beliefs are shaken to the core when he and his crew must find a way to save Nell – and themselves – before it is too late.”

Check out the debut trailer for The Last Exorcism:

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THE LAST EXORCISM TRAILER

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The plot may be familiar, i.e. priest visits small-town family with demonic daughter troubles, but the presentation definitely doesn’t disappoint with a lot of disturbing imagery that, at least from the trailer, doesn’t seem to go over-the-top. Judging by what we can see here, the film appears to follow closely to the tone of the movie that inspired the genre – William Friedkin’s The Exorcist.

That said, at this point, the documentary “style” of the film could make or break The Last Exorcism. The format definitely has advantages – preying on the audience’s nerves with chaotic and jostled camera work. But the frantic style could also detract from the creepy tone that made earlier exorcism endeavors so engaging.

Not to mention the fact, and I realize we’re all suspending disbelief here, but when portions of a horror film are presented documentary style – it’s especially hard to understand, outside of the needs of the actual film, why anyone would keep rolling. Even during last summer’s hit Paranormal Activity, there were numerous awkward explanations for why Micah kept picking up the camera.

What do you think of another exorcism film? Do you think the documentary camera style will be a good or bad addition?

The Last Exorcism opens August 27, 2010.

Source: Yahoo Movies