Deadfall is a neo-Noir drama/thriller from Austrian filmmaker Stefan Ruzowitzky (The Counterfeiters) that features several Hollywood stars and readily-recognized faces, but no one bankable enough to anchor a big hit on their own (on their own yet, in some cases). This includes Eric Bana (Munich), Olivia Wilde (TRON Legacy), Charlie Hunnam (Sons of Anarchy), and Kate Mara (American Horror Story), as well as Oscar-nominee Kris Kristofferson (Blade) and Oscar-winner Sissy Spacek (most recently seen in The Help).

The film begins a theatrical release in the U.S. this December, nearly a month after it becomes available On Demand. It’s easier to understand the reason for that, once you’ve watched the official Deadfall trailer (more on that later).

In Deadfall, Bana and Wilde adapt Southern accents to play siblings Addison and Liza, on the run after a successful casino robbery. However, an accident during their getaway leaves the duo stranded without a wheel man, unable to reach the Canadian border (and safety) in the middle of an encroaching blizzard. The two decide to temporarily go their separate ways, with Addison leading the authorities on a wild goose chase across the country (and several dead bodies in his wake). Liza, however, is picked up and sheltered by a kindly ex-boxer (Hunnam), whom she quickly takes a liking to.

Liza and new beau head out to a Thanksgiving rendezvous with the latter’s parents (Kristofferson and Spacek), offering Wilde’s character a chance at real happiness and honest living. That paves the way for an emotionally-charged showdown, when Addison comes looking to “rescue” his sister.

Check out the Deadfall poster below:

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The trailer footage for Deadfall makes the film look competent in execution, but an otherwise unremarkable Noir thriller that would’ve been direct-to-DVD fodder had it not been for the name cast (see: The Cold Light of Day, for another example). Bana and Wilde usually make for engaging (or, at the least, pretty) leads, but here they’re saddled with bland dialogue. Moreover, Ruzowitzky’s solid direction and effectively bleak visual style appear to be hindered by the banal plot mechanics featured in newcomer Zach Dean’s script.

Deadfall premiered earlier this year at the Tribeca Film Festival and (no surprise) the early consensus is that its promising cast is let down by a generic screenplay. Nonetheless, the film seems decently put-together and could offer entertainment value for those looking for something new to watch at home (rather than trudging out to the local theater).

Look for Deadfall to premiere on Video On Demand (VOD) on November 2nd, 2012, before it begins a limited theatrical release on December 7th.

Source: Hulu, Entertainment Weekly