David S. Goyer is one of the better-known names in the comic book movie biz, having collaborated with Christopher Nolan on the scripts for all three of his Batman movies, and being the writer for Zack Snyder’s upcoming Man of Steel reboot. Now he’s been recruited for another writing job that involves rebooting a longtime popular franchise, Legendary Pictures’ Godzilla revamp.

Gareth Edwards is the man calling the shots on the new Godzilla, which will attempt to kick off a new series of films featuring the Japanese monster in a more successful fashion than Roland Emmerich’s critically-despised 1998 film did.

Deadline is reporting that Goyer will work from an earlier draft of the Godzilla screenplay penned by David Callaham, the co-writer of the 2005 Doom movie and The Expendables. Needless to say, Goyer being onboard for this reboot is generally being received as good news.

However, despite some shining credentials on his resume, Goyer’s previous filmography has tended to be hit or miss. His script collaborations with top-notch directors like Chris Nolan, Guillermo del Toro (Blade II) or Alex Proyas (Dark City) tend to turn out quite well; when Goyer directs his own screenplay (Blade: Trinity, The Unborn), the results have generally been pretty lackluster.

Point being: Edwards has already earned a small but loyal cult following, due to his work on the clever indie sci-fi project Monsters, and has already expressed his determination to deliver a quality Godzilla reboot. So this reads as a potential new addition to the list of good Goyer projects.

Outside of the original 1954 film, most Godzilla movies have generally been less allegorical in design and more campy adventures that feature an actor in a rubber suit as the titular radioactive creature, doing battle with similarly silly bizarre creatures brought to life using practical effects. Emmerich’s 1998 film differed with its use of CGI, but was nonetheless just as goofy (but, most agree, in a less charming way) than its lower-budgeted predecessors.

It seems much more likely that Goyer and Edwards will go the route of the original Godzilla film, by approaching the story of a monster wreaking havoc against humanity in a dead-serious manner. Monsters is an excellent example of how a movie featuring fantastical sci-fi creatures can still function as a character-driven piece; all the same, Edwards will certainly up the action ante significantly in his first big-budget project. Hopefully, the flick will retain some semblance of intelligence after the fact – or, at the very least, not be as dumb as Emmerich’s movie.

We’ll keep you posted on the status of the Godzilla reboot as more information is released.

Source: Deadline