We have not reported much on the Darren Aronofsky supernatural thriller Black Swan because, well, there hasn’t been much to report. The film has been in post-production since early February and we are still waiting on a release date.

I read the script a few months ago. After all, the buzz surrounding the film was intriguing. The two stars, Natalie Portman and Mila Kunis, were to engage in a heated embrace – destined to get audiences in a frenzy. On the merit of that rumor, and my own personal admiration for Darren Aronofsky’s writing, I flew through the screenplay in less than an hour and wanted to read it again.

Black Swan deals with some serious issues of rivalry and jealousy. At times, it reminds you of Christopher Nolan’s The Prestige. In addition to the rivalry, it also finds a way to connect the audience with ballerinas. Many felt magic was a laughable profession until The Prestige showed a more serious side. Black Swan finds a way to do the same for ballet.

Take this movie seriously. The story is riveting, exciting and definitely controversial. Yet, amidst all that hype, it is grounded in a sort of dramatic world that is believable and engaging. So, how can a script that produces so many positive adjectives still be in the shadows of Hollywood?

I understand that Black Swan is not Thor or Batman 3. There are no hordes of fans itching to learn the next bit of information about the film – but that may be Fox Searchlight’s fault. Do they not realize what a gem they’ve got on their hands? Why has the production company not released any information on the film besides the generic listings on IMDb?

The obvious assumptions come to mind – editing problems, budget fiasco, re-shoots, etc. After all, Aronfosky is no stranger to production holdups. Brad Pitt was supposed to star in The Fountain before creative differences and a contract holdout halted production. Hugh Jackman joined the project, saved the day and now the film is as cherished as it is hated.

But the point is, we have yet to hear a single word uttered about Black Swan. While it may have the skin of an independent drama, it has the actors and writing of a movie people will talk about well into awards season. There is still a good six months left in 2010. It shouldn’t take more than two of those to promote this film. But I find it hard to believe the team behind Black Swan can announce a date and garner the interest necessary to release an acclaimed film.

What do you think of Black Swan? Are you aching for a late-2010 release? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.