Former star of Two and a Half Men and everyone’s favorite crazy person Charlie Sheen claims he’s saying buh-bye to television after his new FX show Anger Management runs its course. Sheen was his typical candid self on his future plans to retire after 30 years in show business where he discusses his career, his fans and what may be his final piece of work.

In chatting with The New York Times, Sheen proclaims that Anger Management is it for him, labeling it his “swan song” and before talking about his career.

“There’s a lot more out there to do than make-believe, you know? I mean, I’m grateful, got a dream life as a direct result of television, you know? But at some point you just get tired of wearing somebody else’s clothes, saying somebody else’s words and working in somebody else’s space. I’m also aware of the fact that you don’t get these kinds of shots in the same lifetime. You’re only supposed to have one hit show, unless you’re Kelsey Grammer. When I’m done with this business it’s just going to be about soccer games and amusement parks and when this ends, I’m done. This is my swan song.”

Sheen’s new comedy will premiere June 28th with a preliminary 10-episode order and the potential for more based on ratings. In what seems like a precaution to avoid a repeat of what happened on Two and a Half Men, the 46-year-old actor did not take too kindly to the network’s inquiries into the current state of his health or if he would submit to random drug testing.

“I told them to go fuck themselves with that one. It’s an invasion of privacy, man. Total invasion of privacy. If they say, ‘What’s going on?’ I’m like, I don’t know, what’s going on with you? ‘Well, you seem a little…’ Really, that’s your opinion? How does the work look? ‘Well, the work’s great but…’ Everything after ‘but’ is a dial tone. Go to hell.”

Despite being fired (with his beloved character being gruesomely killed) and replaced by Ashton Kutcher for his very public partying ways, Sheen claims to be a gentle, misunderstood soul and that he also believes that forgiving fans actually have his back on his upcoming return to TV. Sheen goes on to say:

“Inside here, regardless of what the persona may be, I’m still the seven-year-old kid in the back of the class, afraid to raise his hand. I don’t want this – all of this – to extinguish that child. Because it can. And I refuse to grow up. People are like, ‘You still look young.’ I’m like, ‘I don’t believe in aging.’ I don’t believe in failure, fatigue or excuses. I don’t believe in them. You’re on two hours’ sleep and you’re shooting your eighth scene of the day — so what? Do it. The Nike slogan doesn’t say ‘Just Try It.’ ‘Just Good Luck With It.’ It says ‘Just Do It.’ And you do it.”

“[The fans] They seem to be rooting pretty hard for this next thing. And the ones that pay attention know that I’m not just some loose cannon that’s out there making shit up. Or trying to set up a different image of who I think I am or trying to convince them I’m somebody different. I think that’s the reason people have stayed with me, is because I’ve just always been honest. I’ve always been like, ‘I did it, sorry, nobody got hurt, nobody got arrested.’ Not all the time. And you move on. A friend of mine, a guy I really respect, says that as long as you’re teachable, then you have some sense of humility. And to be teachable you have to listen. No one listens anymore.”

Whether his recent ramblings on retirement turn out to be true remains to be seen – but whatever your personal feelings may be about Charlie Sheen, he has a way of bluntly speaking for himself (for better or worse) so there’s ultimately no point to keep carping on the guy. The curiosity of Sheen’s post “Bi-Winning” meltdown return to TV might be enough to give his new show high initial viewership, but with the star already eyeballing the exit door it probably wont be the breakout hit Two and a Half Men turned out to be.

Catch Anger Management July 28th on FX.

Source: The New York Times (via EW)