Thanks to a release date reshuffle, the remake of classic 70s horror film Carrie isn’t out in theaters yet, despite originally being set for a March debut. On the bright side, the new October release means that horror fans will get to see it in the month of Halloween, where it will compete with Sergei Bodrov’s The Seventh Son, Paranormal Activity 5 and Spike Lee’s remake of Oldboy.

That extra seven months is a pretty long wait, considering the first teaser trailer for the film was released over six months ago and we’ve already seen the first full trailer along with a number of promotional stills. Depending on how you look at it, moviegoers either have a lot of time to get excited for Carrie, or a lot of time to lose interest.

No doubt there is still at least one more trailer to come, but in the meantime Kino Gallery has revealed three new stills that show Chloë Grace Moretz in the role of the awkward, bullied teen and Julianne Moore as her overbearing fundamentalist Christian mother. Both actresses have big shoes to fill, as their roles were originally played with wide-eyed innocence by Sissy Spacek and with terrifying intensity by Piper Laurie, respectively, but these are very solid casting choices and the footage of their performances so far shows a lot of promise.

Technically speaking, the final image is a spoiler for the end of the film, but the marketing for Carrie seems to assume that everyone will, by this point, have either seen the original version or found out how it ends through “pig’s blood at the prom” references. In fact, neither Stephen King’s novel nor Brian de Palma’s film had many qualms about revealing the end of the story ahead of time; the book frames the story with accounts of the disaster so that the reader is informed ahead of time that things are going to end very badly, and the posters and trailer for the 1976 film made liberal use of imagery from the prom scenes.

Given director Kimberley Peirce’s comments about “how very relevant this material is right now,” and her promise to deliver a modernization of the story, Carrie might be one of the more risky releases of 2013. Like Lynne Ramsay’s We Need to Talk About Kevin, the story deals with a school massacre, albeit one that is executed using the somewhat non-traditional weapon of telekinesis, and there’s room for some very profound social commentary. With that, of course, comes plenty of room for a misstep, but Carrie is definitely one of the remakes to watch.

Carrie is out in theaters on October 18th, 2013.

Source: KinoGallery (via The Playlist)