Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) has come a long way since the events of Captain America: The First Avenger. After being put on ice for a few decades, the super-strong hero has been forced to grow acclimated to modern life and – in The Avengers – to working alongside superheroes who are even more powerful than himself.

Based on the trailer that was released last year, Captain America: The Winter Soldier looks like a much more ‘grown-up’ outing than Cap’s first adventure, putting the spotlight on S.H.I.E.L.D. and its ethics, and asking serious questions about just how far the agency should be willing to go in order to protect the Earth. If each Marvel movie has its own flavor, then Captain America: The Winter Soldier looks is a classic political thriller – albeit one with elaborate action sequences and superheroes.

Speaking to The LA Times on the set of Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Evans explained that while Steve might have stopped marvelling at every new piece of technology he comes across (after fighting a Norse trickster god and an army of aliens, Twitter probably doesn’t look quite so revolutionary), he’s still having trouble reconciling his own moral standards with the realities of his work with S.H.I.E.L.D.

To quote Evans:

“For Steve, it’s about what is right. He’s relatively acclimated to the modern day — it’s not tech shock anymore, he’s not just like, ‘What’s a cellphone?’ It’s more about, given his situation, given the company he works for, what are we doing that’s the right thing? How much privacy, civil liberties are we willing to compromise for security? It’s pretty crazy how relevant it is right now.”

The LA Times also has some new images from Captain America: The Winter Soldier, including a shot of Anthony Mackie as the Falcon, and another of Steve out of his usual uniform.


Luckily for Steve, he’s not without friends to help him through this period of trouble and uncertainty. He has a good working relationship with Natasha Romanoff AKA Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson), and also finds someone to relate to in veteran Sam Wilson AKA The Falcon. Though they don’t know each other well, Evans says that there’s a resonance between the two characters.

“Meeting Mackie’s character, he used to serve, now he works at the VA counseling guys who come home with PTSD — they connect on that level. I think they’re both wounded warriors who don’t bleed on other people. Cap has no one to bleed on. I think Mackie knows how to handle people like that. … Sometimes when things are bad, trusting a stranger is the way to go.”

President of production and puppet master of the Marvel cinematic universe, Kevin Feige, also commented on the strong political overtones of Captain America: The Winter Soldier, claiming that the film embraces the tone of the original comics. Whereas Steve Rogers was originally thawed out in the era of Watergate and the JFK assassination, the Captain America of the 21st century finds himself in a world where it’s possible to, for example, spy on people through their phones and social media.

Steve Rogers’ powers are suited to a more grounded Marvel movie like this, since he doesn’t fly through the air or summon lightning like some of the other Avengers, and Captain America: The Winter Soldier definitely looks like an intriguing addition to the Marvel movie universe.

Captain America: The Winter Soldier is out in theaters on April 4, 2014.

Source: The LA Times (via CBM)