With Cars 2 now officially running laps around theaters (to mixed reviews) it’s time for Disney/Pixar to start generating hype for their next big summer tentpole film, which will be Brave, a fantasy adventure drawn from the culture and lore of old Scotland.

The Brave teaser trailer debuted this week alongside Cars 2, and has now made its way online. Check it out here.

For those unfamiliar, here is the official synopsis for Brave:

Brave is set in the mystical Scottish Highlands, where Merida is the princess of a kingdom ruled by King Fergus (Billy Connolly) and Queen Elinor (Emma Thompson). An unruly daughter and an accomplished archer, Merida one day defies a sacred custom of the land and inadvertently brings turmoil to the kingdom. In an attempt to set things right, Merida seeks out an eccentric old Wise Woman (Julie Walters) and is granted an ill-fated wish. Also figuring into Merida’s quest — and serving as comic relief — are the kingdom’s three lords: the enormous Lord MacGuffin (Kevin McKidd), the surly Lord Macintosh (Craig Ferguson), and the disagreeable Lord Dingwall (Robbie Coltrane).

That’s a vague description, for sure, but if you need some clarification: young protagonist inadvertently causes a problem, then must set out on a quest to make things right. In completing her quest, she also happens to learn about a herself and correct her inner turmoil. A long stare at the title should at least give you a hint about what that inner conflict is about and what kinds of themes this movie will explore.

Or, you could simply take a metaphoric hint from the Brave teaser trailer below:

Recent films like Tangled or (to lesser extent) Red Riding Hood have tried to re-align our perceptions about the roles of heroines in the fairy tale genre. Where previously they were almost always presented as distressed damsels in desperate need of a man’s saving hand, modern heroines (even the dainty princess types) are being offered up as clever, strong, capable, and, well, brave young women fully capable of saving themselves (and maybe even a few of us boys while they’re at it).

It’ll be interesting to see how Pixar – known for its marriage of grown up themes to cartoon aesthetic – handles its first real princess tale, and what image of “modern woman” they present to the world (and impressionable young kids) via the character of Merida. If I know Pixar (and I like to pretend that I do) they made this lass’s hair fiery red with good reason. But will Merida make it into the ranks of famous Disney princesses?

Also something to look forward to with this film: learning more about Scottish mythology.

Brave will be in theaters on June 22, 2012.

Source: Disney Pixar