Currently, Sony is developing several films based on hot video game properties – Watch Dogs, Uncharted, The Last of Us, Gran Turismo, and Raving Rabbids, just to name a few. And if that weren’t enough, the studio is apparently also interested in reviving the long-suffering BioShock movie.

It was about a year ago the game’s creator, Ken Levine, confirmed that Universal’s production on a BioShock film was dead. When director Gore Verbinksi was still attached, he and Universal couldn’t agree on a budget or whether or not the film should have an R rating. Once he left and another director was brought in, Levine no longer felt comfortable with the treatment being pitched and chose to kill the project.

But there’s hope we may yet still see a BioShock movie. Kotaku is reporting that Sony has registered three new domains – bioshock-movie.com, bioshock-movie.net and bio-shock.net – which clearly hint that they may be starting production on a BioShock movie of their own.

BioShock, for those unaware, is a first-person shooter set in 1960 where, after surviving a plane crash, the player swims to an abandoned lighthouse and finds a submersible that takes them to the underwater utopia, Rapture. The city is in terrible disrepair and has been overrun by mutants, dangerous drug addicts, and mad geniuses.

The player’s one ally is Atlas, a revolutionary who led the lower, working-classes in rebellion against the wealthier citizens, and much of the game is spent navigating Rapture to meet him. Throughout the game, the player uncovers the history of Rapture’s construction and its inevitable downfall. Things continue to get weirder and weirder as more mysteries are unraveled, like the relationship between the eerie Little Sisters and their Big Daddies.

Due to its graphic violence and often gruesome revelations, BioShock is a very mature game, and any film hoping to do it justice would likely need an R rating. This was an issue for Universal who, after witnessing the R-rated Watchmen bomb at the box office, became unsure about producing Verbinski’s “hard R” adaptation.

Levine, however, hasn’t ruled out the chance for another attempt at a BioShock movie, but he did say that it would happen only if “the right combination of people” were involved. Perhaps Sony has just those right people in mind and has convinced Levine  – who is also working on a screenplay for Warner Bros.’ Logan’s Run remake – that the time for a BioShock movie is now.

How would you feel about BioShock being adapted as a film? Would an R rating be required to properly bring the game’s complex story to the screen? Let us know what you think in the comments below!

More news on whether or not Sony is pursuing a BioShock film as this story develops.

Source: Kotaku