Three years have passed since Syfy’s enormously successful Battlestar Galactica remake wrapped up its run. Since then, the network has twice attempted to maintain the space drama’s cultural cache – once with the short-lived Caprica and then with Battlestar Galactica: Blood and Chrome.

Announced during Caprica‘s flagging run, Blood and Chrome was originally developed as a full series like its predecessor. Eventually, Syfy decided to pass on airing the spinoff. NBC Universal subsequently arranged for the series to be shown as a Web series, with the possibility of a television premiere at a future date. After a long and tumultuous production, the space opera will finally begin showing episodes later this week.

EW reports that Battlestar Galactica: Blood and Chrome will premiere its first episode in just a few short days. On Friday, November 9, the first installment of the Web series will be posted on Youtube channel Machinima Prime. Blood and Chrome will be eventually be available as ten short episodes, at seven to twelve minutes apiece. Machinima released a new trailer for the series along with the premiere announcement, showing off more robust action and atmosphere than previous glimpses.

Blood and Chrome will follow the early years of eventual Galactica leader William Adama (Luke Pasqualino), as the Twelve Colonies struggle through their first war with the Cylons. If the trailer is anything to go by, it looks as if Adama faces brutal battles with the toasters both in the cockpit of his Viper and hand-to-hand on the ground. Blood and Chrome will co-star Ben Cotton (Alcatraz), Jill Teed (This Means War), and Lili Bordán (The River).

It’s difficult to argue that Battlestar Galactica: Blood and Chrome was an absolutely essential spinoff. Ronald D. Moore‘s Battlestar Galactica was a landmark science-fiction series, gaining both audiences and critical plaudits during its four-season run. However, when the credits finally rolled over the show’s divisive ending, it didn’t leave much room for expansion. Galactica‘s universe wasn’t like Star Trek or Stargate – settings ripe for exploration. Instead, its depiction of the universe was lonely, cold, and ultimately caught up in endless cycles of bloodshed. Needless to say, Galactica‘s final moments did not encourage further adventures in its narrative playground.

As such, Blood and Chrome‘s production felt a bit mercenary. Caprica had the advantage of being very distinct from its forerunner, even if its leaden pacing and narrative flaws quickly turned audiences away. Though a prequel, it dealt with story elements that were never even touched upon in Battlestar Galactica. Blood and Chrome feels like it might have the opposite problem – a fast-paced return to Battlestar Galactica‘s signature action and suspense, while saddled with a story whose outcome we already know. Though we rarely saw it depicted, the first Cylon war was fairly well covered by Battlestar. After all, we know that Adama will survive, so can Blood and Chrome convince the audience to care about the other characters, or will the lack of stakes undercut the show’s tension?

And yet, one cannot help but be impressed by the visuals of the above trailer. Showing off production values far above the usual Web-based television series, Blood and Chrome looks to be an intense experience. Its relative shortness could be a boon – at a total length roughly equivalent to a feature film, the series might play as a quick, spectacle-packed side-story rather than a lengthy narrative trying to stand on its own.

Battlestar Galactica: Blood and Chrome episodes will be available November 9, 2012.

Source: Entertainment Weekly