The 10 Best Things About Chris Nolan’s Dark Knight Trilogy

Published 2 years ago by , Updated July 28th, 2012 at 1:47 pm, This is a list post.

10 Best Things About Nolan's Batman Trilogy

Batman Stands Alone in Batman Begins In 1997, the Batman saga seemed to jump the shark when George Clooney donned the bat suit in the critically-reviled film Batman & Robin. After four films in that series - featuring three different actors as the Caped Crusader- the franchise seemed to have nowhere to go. It was difficult to imagine then that Batman would soon be revitalized in a new series of films that were both commercially successful and critically-praised. But that changed in 2005 when Christian Bale put on the suit, Chris Nolan stood behind the camera and a new franchise was born with Batman Begins. Now, it's hard - especially for young people - to imagine Batman movies without Nolan behind the camera. Seven years after Begins hit theaters, the trilogy reached its inevitable conclusion with the release of The Dark Knight Rises (Read our review). With that in mind, we decided to list the 10 best things about this unforgettable trilogy of films.

The Themes

Aaron Eckhart in The Dark Knight Superhero movies are often seen as popcorn flicks. Viewers enter the theater to be entertained and a great superhero film can do that. But Nolan's Batman films were deeper and more thoughtful than that. Each of them was entertaining, but the movies spoke to something deeper about the human spirit. They struggled with profound themes such as heroism, honor and integrity. District Attorney Harvey Dent was a prime example of this. A public icon who stood for clean streets and ethical superiority became a vengeful monster when his loved one was murdered. But even after his death, Dent's legacy was maintained by those who thought to serve a greater good. The idea of hiding the truth about a political icon in order to maintain public morale, while undermining a true hero's innocence, was a fine example of how the Nolan's films took on deep concepts and made them a core part of the franchise.

The Tone

Batman and Bodies in the Dark Knight Rises Many of the previous Batman films were dark affairs. Tim Burton's films presented Gotham as a cold and dark town with seedy characters and an ugly underbelly. But Nolan's films took the darkness even deeper. Never descending into silliness or caricature, these movies maintained a serious tone even as other superhero movies offered more light-hearted fare. Nolan understood the solemnity associated with the story of a man who witnessed his parents get murdered and sought  vengeance against his city's criminal masterminds. These Batman movies were a far cry from movies like The Fantastic Four and the Spider-Man films - and yet, they succeeded despite offering up stories and issues that were far more serious in nature.

The Boldness

Maggie Gyllenhaal in The Dark Knight In the latest episode of the Screen Rant Underground Podcast, Kofi Outlaw noted how shocking Rachel Dawes' death was in The Dark Knight. Dawes, an important supporting player in the first two films, was Bruce Wayne's on-again, off-again love interest. Few writers would dare to kill off such a character, and even fewer would dare to do it in the middle of a movie. But TDK showed that the filmmakers were willing to do anything to tell a good story. It was hard not to be surprised when Dawes was killed, but it was difficult not to be impressed with how Nolan used that tragedy to transform both Dent and Wayne into even more troubled figures. There were several other notable tragedies in this trilogy, but Rachel Dawes' death was the most interesting; killing off such a vital character set in motion a series of events that made this trilogy even more profound than it would have been, otherwise.

The Acting

Christian Bale and Michael Caine in the Dark Knight Rises From Batman Begins onward, it was hard not to be impressed by the A-list cast that Nolan brought to the series. Morgan Freeman and Michael Caine (two Oscar-winning actors known for long and brilliant careers) accepted small roles in all three films, playing technological genius Lucius Fox and butler Alfred Pennyworth, respectively. Nolan was also lucky to get a leading man like Christian Bale, a highly-acclaimed character actor who won an Oscar for his performance in The Fighter (2010).  Also on board for the entire series was acclaimed thespian Gary Oldman, who played the small but pivotal role of Commissioner Gordon, Batman's unlikely ally. There were dozens of other highly-acclaimed  actors who took on roles in the series, including Liam Neeson, Tom Wilkinson, Heath Ledger, Aaron Eckhart, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Tom Hardy, Anne Hathaway, Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Marion Cotillard. It's hard to argue with a cast like that, and many of these actors delivered some of their best performances in these films.

The Villains

Heath Ledger as the Joker One of the greatest things about this entire franchise was the Oscar-worthy performance of Heath Ledger in The Dark Knight. The Joker was portrayed convincingly by Jack Nicholson in Tim Burton's 1989 Batman movie, but Ledger took the character to a whole different level, replacing Nicholson's manic character with a psychopath intent on showing the darkness that lies in each of us. Ledger posthumously won the Academy Award for his brilliant performance and created one of the greatest cinematic villains that's ever existed. Of course, Liam Neeson and Tom Hardy took respective turns as the murderous thugs in Batman Begins and The Dark Knight Rises, and both created solid characters, but it was Ledger's performance alone that created a new breed of cinematic villain.

The Direction

Christopher Nolan Directing Christoper Nolan is an imaginative and intriguing director. In movies like Memento and Insomnia, he told complex stories with strong thoughtful characters. Despite using some of the same concepts in his films, Nolan's movies are always worth talking about and debating. From Batman Begins on, the auteur redefined what a superhero movie can be. He showed us that they can be serious, high-class affairs that combine special effects and action sequences with discussions about passionate ideas and values. The filmmaker created a series of films that comic book fans can enjoy alongside general audiences and critics, who often look down upon the genre. Even though Batman's cinematic saga isn't over, and someone will likely soon take over the franchise, it will be difficult for the next set of films to creatively stand up against Nolan's trilogy.

The Main Character

Christian Bale and the Batman Suit Bruce Wayne, the flawed but self-sacrificing character at the heart of the franchise, is a complex and deep character, and Nolan's films presented him as the type of hero he was born to be. With superhero films, viewers are often presented with noble good guys fighting crazy bad guys to save the world, but Wayne's mission was more nuanced than that. He was simply a scarred young man hoping to avenge the brutal murder of his parents.  The feelings of insecurity and loss associated with that traumatic event led him to don a mask in order to protect Gotham from the thieves and monsters who threatened it. Even while he wore the cape and cowl, he was still a reluctant hero who in TDK  found relief  in the fact that a politician represented to Gotham a new breed of hero who didn't need to wear a mask in order to create order in the city. Those hopes faded, but the idea that Wayne wasn't a typical hero never did.

The Relationships

Christian Bale and Gary Oldman Batman would not be such a successful hero if it were not for his trio of allies who have looked out for him - sometimes begrudgingly - throughout the series. Those allies were Lucius Fox, Alfred Pennyworth and Jim Gordon. The relationships that Wayne/Batman shared with each of these characters helped him become an unlikely hero. From Gordon's trust in him in Batman Begins to Fox's support for him (despite their ethical disagreements) in The Dark Knight,  to Alfred's overt affection for him in Dark Knight Rises, these characters proved that the Caped Crusader couldn't be a hero without having his friends stand by him. Although none of these characters was ever the main focus of the story, their supporting turns provided much of the series' heart. Of course, these characters were created by strong actors, who allowed them serve an equally strong purpose throughout the trilogy.

The Special Effects

Special Effects in The Dark Knight Rises As previously noted, director Chris Nolan knows how to tell a great story on film. But in a superhero film, he was also expected to include some special effects - especially during the action sequences. And in all three films, Nolan proved up to the task. The explosions and effects in these movies never felt over-the-top and obnoxious. They were oftentimes more restrained and powerful than the effects in other, similar, features. With the bridge explosion in Dark Knight Rises, for instance, the effect wasn't to blow up the bridge in a flashy, Michael Bay style. The explosion was more subtle and clear, making it far less cartoonish and far more realistic. Such effects helped make the destruction that occurs in all three films more sobering than they would have been, otherwise.

The Completeness

Christopher Nolan and the Bat Signal Dark Knight Rises was, unfortunately, Chris Nolan's final Batman film. The director has proclaimed repeatedly that this was his final film about the Caped Crusader and even penned a goodbye letter to the series. In TDKR, that finality was clear. Nolan just wasn't making the film in order to end his partnership with the franchise; he made it to end his franchise completely. Without spoiling anything, TDKR focuses a lot on the ideas and characters that were presented in the first film. As noted in our list of  facts you should know before seeing TDKR, seeing Batman Begins and its sequel beforehand is necessary to appreciate  the third film for what it is: the final chapter in a well-plotted trilogy. Not only did Nolan wrap up Batman's story's, he used the final movie to question many of the actions in the earlier films, leaving viewers to remember how well these chapters work together as a complete series.

10 Best Things about the Christopher Nolan Batman Trilogy

The Dark Knight Trilogy Poster (Fan-Made) The Dark Knight Rises is the end of what many fans believe is one of the best trilogies of all time. In three chapters, director Christoper Nolan told the story of how Bruce Wayne became the Caped Crusader and how that affected who he was and what he eventually became. It was a masterful series of films that will not soon be forgotten. One can only hope that the next director to helm a Batman film appreciates and builds off of Nolan's brilliant legacy. Here, again, is our list of the 10 best things about Nolan's Batman trilogy.
  1. The Themes: Thoughtful Ideas to Ponder in a Superhero Movie
  2. The Tone: A serious setting for a serious story
  3. The Boldness: 'Darkness before the Dawn'
  4. The Acting: A-List Actors all around
  5. The Villains: Unforgettable Antagonists
  6. The Direction: A Filmmaker with a Vision
  7. The Complexity of Bruce Wayne: A Complicated Hero
  8. The Relationships: Wayne's Strongest Allies
  9. The Special Effects: A Visually-Engaging Film Series
  10. The Completeness : A Finite Story with a Clear Beginning and End
For more news on Batman and my thoughts on this remarkable series of films, follow me on Twitter @johnhanlon.
TAGS: batman, batman begins, the dark knight, the dark knight rises

132 Comments

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  1. No. 11 No Bat nipples

    • hahaha YES! hit the nail on the head there.

  2. Great list. I love this series and Christopher Nolan. I look forward to what he will do next.

  3. Excellent article. I couldn’t agree more. Only one minor thing I would add…Hans Zimmer’s/James Newton Howard’s scores. Without a doubt, one of the best themes/scores of our past time.

    • yes very true

    • Totally agree with you there, I think the score played a bigger role than the special effects.

      • Agreed, especially in the first two films. I was thinking that TDK’s score played the most crucial part to its film as compared to Batman Begins’ score and TDKR’s, but then I listened to BB’s score again and couldn’t decide. The way that Zimmer and Howard incorporate the sound of bat wings into the music to foreshadow Wayne’s coming mantra is really something special.

        • I have no idea why I used the word “mantra”. I meant “role” or “alter ego”.

          • ….close enough.

  4. For u

  5. 1 – Batman’s also Bruce Wayne’s – TECH.
    2 – SkyHook from TDK in Japan and TDKR with Bane.
    3 – I would had loved to see Batman from TDKR with his BB Gauntlets.
    4 – I loved when Mogan Freeman told Bale in TDK, These Gauntlets will do just fine with CAT’s…..Catwoman………LOL!!
    5 – I love everything about The Nolan’s Dark Kinght.

  6. Great List. I love the series and still, unfortunately waiting to watch the finale. The film opened my eyes to what comic book adaptations can become and this list perfectly sums up why it has had a profound effect. I agree the score is a great addition to the list as well.

    While there apparently some controversial reaction to the film- some love it and some are extremely dissapointed- I agree with what was said in podcast here: even the weakest installment fullfills its purpose in the over arching storylines and is yards ahead of most other comic book based films. That is encouraging words.

    One thing I love about the trilogy so far is how each film evolves and differentiates from the other installments. Batman Begins, The Dark Knight, and The Dark Knight Rises are so different in terms of how they were made whether its lighting, POV, pacing, tone, etc.

  7. After the terrible shooting incident I really have a strong feeling that this isn’t the last outing for Christian Bale. Although alot would say so but he DID leave the door slightly open if a good script was written lets hope so. I would like to see this go on!! Thank you for article

    • No no more bale as batman. with MoS coming out and dc wanting to copy marvel with JLA we need a batman is even more true to the comics than Nolan(and Nolan wasn’t that great TDKR was a lazy film them Nolan really didnt give a s*** about if you read quotes from his wife saying by the time they made it they didn’t even want to hear the word batman again) I say bring on a batman that has the same tone as nolan films but up the action not once did I see an acrobatic batman doing flips and putting bombs on bad guys or over the top robotic henchmen. Im ready for something new.

      • TDKR was definitely NOT lazy…by ANY stretch of the imagination. Nolan DID feel passionate about the films, BUT he also felt tired after making them. Great work tends to make one feel that way, just for the effort involved.

        You’re seriously being negative on a thread that is SPECIFICALLY positive in nature?

        I mean…really; why not just go to a thread for “The Avengers”? That film had what you are obviously desiring in a CBM.

        • well thanks for letting me know we are not allowed to have any disagreements with the article.

      • Bombs on bad guys? Why would batman blow someone up…

        • The bad guys Batman put bombs on are usually meta-humans or aliens, and they would just be misdirected by the blast or slightly injured.

      • @ tankD

        Id pretty much agree with ya. Id like to see the next Batman reboot aswell as the DCMU be somewhat as close as possible to what Batman:TAS, Superman:TAS,Justice League was, only in live action of-course. I like all the Batman films to date but Batman:TAS imo stays more true to characters.

      • Nope. The Dark Knight Rises was excellent! Chris Nolan is a terrific filmmaker.

  8. a great movie,i´ve watched it yesterday. and the score in every scene was brilliant. now the summer blockbusters are nearly finished,it´s a little bit sad. the hobbit can´t come soon enough,now.

  9. Great list but I would have made it 12 things..
    11. The Toys. The Tumbler, The BatPod, the Bat and so on and so on…
    12. The Score. Some people think it became to intrusive but I thought in all 3 films it escalated much like the story and the stakes.
    I’ve seen it twice already in the theater so now I’m in the mode where I wait for the series to hit Blu-ray as a whole. I will pre-order the day it’s announced. :)

  10. the most important thing is to explain where everything came from. I haven`t watched the films enough to try to understand that.

  11. Great article for an amazing trilogy that has great actors excellent storyline breathtaking visuals and a brilliant score throughout the journey of Bruce Wayne. It’s sad that the journey has ended but a legendary trilogy is completed.

  12. Two things I would add are the score (like others have mentioned) and the humor.

    I know it’s a dark trilogy but there are some very funny moments.

    I always love this exchange from Batman Begins:

    Alfred: When you told me your grand plan for saving Gotham, the only thing that stopped me from calling the men in white coats is that you told me it wasn’t about trill seeking.

    Bruce: It’s not.

    Alfred: What do you call that? (points at TV show the Tumbler)

    Bruce: Damn good television.

    That and several other lines throughout the trilogy added some much needed levity to the series, which I greatly appreciated.

    • “So that’s what it feels like”

    • LOL I love that moment to. Alfred/Bruce was one of my favourite parts of the whole series and I was legitmately sad when it looked for a while like they were going to end DKR with no positive closure.

      My favourite funniest line would still have to be from Batman Begins:

      Jim Gordon: “Whats that?”

      A swarm of bats appears.

      Batman: “Backup”

      Second favourite would be in The Dark Knight when Bruce decides to turn himself in as Batman-paraphrasing:

      Alfred: “I suppose they will come an arrest me as your accomplice?”

      Bruce: “Actually Im going to tell them the whole thing was your idea”

      But after finally watching TDKR I did love all the Catwoman/Batman interaction. Its probably the first time Batman or Bruce has genuinely smiled and looked like he has enjoyed himself for an extended period of time.

      • Don’t forget Bane’s “What a lovely voice” line. My whole theater erupted in laughter.

    • Totally agree. Chris and Jonah Nolan must have a good sense of humour. My favourite: Alfred- ‘I suppose they’ll arrest me too, as your accomplice.’ Bruce- ‘ACCOMPLICE?! I gonna tell them the whole thing was YOUR idea’.

      • That’s just plain-great ‘ol BRITISH humor. Dry and witty… I love it.

  13. I would love to see another movie (with or without Nolan) set before TDK or even after TDK, I remember hearing one of the cops talking to JGL about how there wasn’t a CONFIRMED batman sighting in 8 years, that does not mean he wasn’t running around here and there right?

    Love for the next director to show exactly why Bruce Wayne’s knee had no cartilage left, and why he had that cane. I said before many times here that they could use Black Mask, Riddler, Penguin, Dead shot, Mr Freeze too.

    -Mr Freeze would be a scientist working for Wayne, but is fired after trying to sell his research to get money for his sick wife, he makes a gun that shoots liquid nitrogen and a protective suit. He teams up with Hugo Strange, because Strange is his wife’s doctor (or Mr Freezes therapist) or maybe he was a super therapist that was poisoned with Scarecrows fear toxin and made him crazy (that way you could continue having scarecrow in the movies)

    -Penguin is an arms dealer, and when it rains while some political figure is giving a speech, the umbrellas have guns inside of them. Have him team up with the Riddler, he has a split personality, one named Edward, the other calls himself Riddler.

    -Black mask hires Dead shot to kill batman after batman took out a drug deal and cost him LOTS of money.

    If they had Onomatopoeia, if it was done right, it would add some creepiness to the films already dark tone. Clayface is a master of disguise, Zsasz too.

    -Zsasz is used as a distraction when riddler wants to do a heist at Wayne Co. because he finds out his true identity and wants to destroy all his tools. (but does not know about the batcave).

    Just some of my ideas, hopefully they have a movie done after BB before TDK.

    • “If they had Onomatopoeia, if it was done right, it would add some creepiness to the films already dark tone. Clayface is a master of disguise, Zsasz too.”

      I mean have Zsasz as a villain, not a master of disguise. My bad.

    • didn’t you watch the first two movies? this is batman in the real world. he has bad knees because anyone would being batman. In TDK just after he jumps off a parking garage onto a moving van to stop the scarecrow, that alone is enough damage right there, super suit or not. You already had a director that showed you that. his name was Christopher Nolan.

      • The last paragraph, read it again, it says “Just some of my ideas, hopefully they have a movie done after BB before TDK.”

        In other words, BEFORE he went off the roof killing two face, BEFORE he went through that car. Someone wrote that, the same guy that is writing this, his name is Brandon.

        • Not sure if people are getting dumber, or I am getting smarter…

        • it would just be superfluous is all i am saying, kinda what the trilogy was not about, Brandon.

          • And all I am saying is…

            IF they made another Batman film using Nolan’s vision, they could use any one of these ideas, or characters mentioned in my first comment.

            And lets face it, no one wants these movies to end, no fan wants another reboot, and absolutely not the people putting out the movies when they get all that money.

            Thats all I am saying.

            Thank you, have a nice day.

            • i was never questioning your opinions nor speculations, only the vocalization an extemporaneous position about an existing plot point already so blatantly displayed. As far as future Batman movie plots go, some of your other ideas are rather quite interesting.

              • Thank you, I tried to think of how to use Poison Ivy, but I can’t think of a way to make her realistic.

                I think out of all the ideas I shared, I like the Mr Freeze idea the best.

                • @ Brandon

                  Regarding Poison Ivy being realistic, i can only think of her debut on Batman:TAS. The way she tried to kill Harvey with a kiss by lipstick she made & the poison arrow guanlet. Theres still alot of villains i wanna see not seen yet from Batman’s rogues gallery, not to mention ones properly done. Id also like to see not just Robin but the whole Bat-Family be explored.

                  • Good idea with Poison Ivy, but not much else I can think of.

                    I would rather have Nightwing (working by himself then with batman like robin does) then Robin, but that is just me.

                    • @ Brandon

                      If the films keep making money & are critically praised than imo there should be no problem. Because they won’t have to have Nightwing in every film. Id start with Dick Grayson becoming Robin at the end of the first film & maybe have him be Robin for 2 films atleast with him ditching the costume in a 4th film. Reason for that is to have Batman be a loner for while again before Batgirl could come in probly because i loved how they showed how smart she was in Batman:TAS before she put on the costume. Then they could bring Tim Drake in the next film with Nightwing making a cameo. Then comes Nightwing’s spin-off films. If the Batman franchise is still ongoing, Nightwing can more than one appearances. I know there’s alot of people who may think it can’t & won’t be done. Im just stating ideas is all. Because theres still countless of characters from Batman comics they haven’t used on film yet aswell use again of-course. It all depends really how well each film does. Then again there’s always the Batman Beyond approach. But my judgement about that would come after who they get for a cast for the first film.

            • No. No. No more movies “using Nolan’s vision.” There comes a time when you have to realize that the story is over and it’s time to move on to the next one. Christopher Nolan told an exceptionally well done story because it was HIS vision; you have to let the next person pursue their own ideas on the characters. Imagine what we would have gotten if Nolan had been forced to fit his vision into what Tim Burton had done before; I doubt it would have been as good. I look forward to the next team of writers and directors and their interpretations of Bruce Wayne and friends.

              • amen. testify! can i get a witness!

  14. John…

    Thank you for the excellent (and oh-so-true) article. TDKR has been taking a lot of abuse, so your piece comes at a perfect time.

    I would add to your list, from posters above: Fantastic soundtrack(s), really cool toys (vehicles AND gadgets/devices), and clever humor…

    Good luck to the next director. This brilliant trilogy will be tough to follow.

  15. Loved the list. The point about the affects misses the point a little. Nolan presents several effects in the trilogy from a distance where the audience just “experiences it”. This is actually a lot like how we experienced 9/11. It was a horrific act, but seen from so far away as to feel unable to do anything about it. The bridges blowing up were almost exactly like that.

    @Brandon – Nice ideas, but you know WB. They won’t make any timeline additions to this that specifically reference what Nolan did without the main actors and director. It would be too much of an “imitation” like Joe Johnston’s addition to Jurassic Park.

    • Effects…

  16. great list but, other than Heath, who else “delivered some of their best performances in these films” ?

    • He just means that all the actors were at the top of their game the whole trilogy. Bale, Oldman, Caine, Freeman, we’re all spectacular throughout each movie. Bale especially in this newest movie raised his game.

  17. and i know you mentioned Nolan’s direction but what about Wally’s ridiculously good cinematography or Lee Smith’s editing and the rest of the technical stuff…

  18. Great list, John and I agree on all ten.
    The most important being the presence of
    Nolan, the visionary on which all visions depend.
    Christopher was also classically mindful in his series.

    Like the original trilogies in ancient Greek drama,
    Nolan’s Batman series were individually complete
    while remaining closely related in theme and story.
    Each film stands alone in its own right separately.

  19. “The idea of hiding the truth about a political icon in order to maintain public morale, while undermining a true hero’s innocence, was a fine example of how the Nolan’s films took on deep concepts and made them a core part of the franchise.”
    Are you talking about how Gordon didn`t reveal the the truth about him in TDKR?

  20. oops, sorryyyy, the typing was taking long which is why i didn`t realized i used the word “the” twice

  21. Great list / article! Good work as always! I’m sad this trilogy is over but also know we were all treated to a once in a lifetime greatness at the same time with these movies. I will walk into the reboot with an open mind and make all efforts possible not to compare it to Nolan’s trilogy. It may be hard but I also want the Batman Nolan left at an elite level to continue as an elite hero.

  22. Beautiful article. Great list. Nolan’s Batman was great. I am fortunate enough to have seen two version of Batman that have been a great reflection of our culture and time. Nolan’s version and Burton’s version.

    Burton’s version, for the time it came out had many trends, tones, etc that represented the culture of the late eighties and early nineties. Prince was in, colors were loud, and corvettes were cool.

    Nolan’s version does the same thing with this Batman. Which is a great example of the complexity of our society today. I am truly thankful to the men behind these films.

    • (“Burton’s version, for the time it came out had many trends”)

      ..By that you mean “camp”? If so then I agree.

  23. speaking of completeness, it looks like a significant thing happened!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Before I speak of this, i want to mention that the ending with it looking like it was bruce and selina sitting across from alfred at a table was just alfred`s imagination, wasn`t it? Remember earlier in the film he was talking about Bruce`s long disappearance from gotham and each year alfred sat down somewhere at an outdoor eating place imagining bruce and a woman sitting at a table across from him?
    But first i wanna ask, with the end scene of john blake being rised into the batcave, setup for robin? And did he really die because people say he could`ve jumped out of the autopilot he used to bring the bomb over the ocean.
    The significant thing is that he did that to save millions of lives from dying. I enjoyed and was touched by much themes and motifs and action in these films but i`m gonna miss christian bale as the vigilante.

    • Are u serious?

    • Are u serious bro?

      • I think he’s serious.

    • Are u serious bro? You’d have to be paying attention not to understand the ending

      • i think you mean not paying attention, lol, i guess my eyes deceived me.
        I didn`t see him jump out and there`s no evidence that he`s alive. They had Bruce Wayne`s grave thinking he was dead. What ok what`d i miss? people make mistakes, you know. I truly thought i saw what i saw.

    • This wasn’t mind games like Inception.

      Bruce IS alive and well and fulfilling Alfred’s dream for him, a life. With the “clean slate” he and Selina can start new. It also showed Alfred clearly acknowledging Bruce and mentioned the autopilot was fixed mths in advance. I really feel ppl are over analyzing that part of the movie.

      • oh, i should`ve replied here, ok, so to all 3 of you, please tell me whatever it is so amazing that i missed. I mustn`t be having halusinations, please, with as simple words that you can use, tell me what my eyes mislead me about. oh wait, so that scene that i described could be alfred`s imagination was real?

        • IT WASN’T ALFRED’S IMAGINATION!

        • I am pretty sure I did spell it out for you in my original post dude.

          • Ok um the way it ended was very confusing and weird, so it was not his imagination, but after it looked like he died and had his grave, with absolutely no explanation it comes out of nowhere that Bruce is surprisingly alive? That would leave people like me confused it is a movie so I thought it was supposed to show how things happen so that it makes sense not for people to guess what happened or to come to a website to find out what happened.
            Dude with my point about how earlier in the film it was alfreds imagination and how real it looked to be his death with no explanation how he survived it makes it an incomplete story. There must be evidence to prove what it really was.

            • Bruce IS alive and well and fulfilling Alfred’s dream for him, a life. With the “clean slate” he and Selina can start new. It also showed Alfred clearly acknowledging Bruce and mentioned the autopilot was fixed mths in advance. I really feel ppl are over analyzing that part of the movie

              1. First when the engineers mention that the autopilot was fixed 6mths before which was during the time Bruce came back as Batman.

              2.Bruce used that scenario Alfred had always wanted for him (Him having a normal life) and made it a reality in this case he did it with Selina. Also worth mentioning Alfred did acknowledge Bruce being there with a nod and Bruce did the same.

              3. They mention the only thing missing were the pearls which Selina was wearing

              4. The fourth thing is that the “clean slate program” that Selina wanted and was given in the end wipes any trace of a person.

              5. Lastly someone fixed the Bat signal.

            • It did show people like you. They went through the work to point out that the Auto pilot was repaired. Plus they showed that the Bat Signal had been repaired by someone as well and you can see Gordon was excited to discover that. There was a clear time gap after Batman took off with the bomb. They cut to Blake on the bridge and then there is an explosion and you see the Jet fly by. Then you see the Jet fly so far away that it is out of site for roughly 10 seconds which then it explodes.

              He had plenty of time to eject and use the auto pilot to keep the jet flying.

              There is no logical reason to assume that Alfred is dreaming. Then it would make no sense for Fox to find out that the auto pilot was repaired and it would leave the question of who the heck fixed the Bat Signal?

              • Also the pearls being missing from his belongings and then seen on Selina’s neck at the end is a dead giveaway lol.

            • i was on the same boat of real nuclear physics too at first, but then there is the fact that Alfred sees Selina in the end of the film. If it was some random girl,different story, but Alfred sees Selina (a woman who Alfred only jokes about, but has no idea of the real romantic entanglement that proceeds his leaving the Wayne Estate.) clear as day. For me that is the final piece of conclusive evidence (besides the already stated above by Merciful Rao) for myself. The second viewing makes all the pieces come together in a beautiful operatic finale. Great finale chapter! The only third chapter I can think of that comes close is Last Crusade (sorry Return of the Jedi)

  24. I Agree with everything that is said in this article. Hope someone comes in and uses Joseph Gordon Levitts to be the new Batman or Nightwing, and faces great villains like Harley Quinne,The Riddler ,Joker pulling strings, and Penguine maybe being a four foot tux wearing Gangster in a realistic tone. With all that being said i would love for the X-men to get back to this style for they where as close as they could get in X-men 1, and x-2.I think Spiderman has hit a reality based tone as close as it can get in the new film, and i would love to see more comicbook films do this, as well as sci fi- monster flicks and any genre for that matter. I love to watch a films draw you in deep and leave you thinking about its story, and ideas.Great job Nolan, I am a huge Marvel film but Marvel in my opinion is getting stomped by Dc’s take on its batman films, and from the looks of things the new Superman film is looking like a more realistic tone and better qaulity of film.

    • Yes it is a better tone and better qaulity of film.

      Is a IMAX.

  25. I lol’d reading 4/10–The Acting–and no mention of Katie Holmes.

    Lolz were had.

  26. I was expecting this final “best thing”! As I left the theater I couldn’t help to think: Damn this whole trilogy was very well plotted, OMG Crazy Nolan!

    Even so, in that context, I felt that the TDK was more an excellent stand alone than crucial for the trilogy.
    Was sort of a dejavu from Matrix Reloaded… (but, in that case, the film itself was not that good).

    Nolan’s Batman is the best set of movies of this gen by far!

  27. Nolan knows what he’s doing. That’s why I’m not flipping out for a 4th film. This is precisely what is required to make history in the cinema industry. He understands this perfectly as a filmmaker. That’s why this franchise has to die with this film. I’m in for spinoffs (Catwoman movie or Robin movie, whatever), but no more Batman.

  28. NIGHTWING MOVIE, NOW!!!

  29. Anyway, now it is time to move on. There is A scene at the end that looks like the possibility of John Blake becoming robin. Lol that would be really weird to have robin without batman but it is also weird to have a scene like that left with no story ahead of it. But now there is a post of the top 10 actors to replace bale as Wayne. Wow are they going to have a trilogy with an ending that looks like a setup for another story incomplete?

    • Not necessarily Robin but his own cape crusader. More likely Nightwing or simething similar. Bruce’s story IS complete, Gotham will always need someone to watch over it so the mantle has just been passed on.

      • Blake being Robin makes as much sense as if Bruce Wayne ditched the whole Batman persona and called him self Bruce-man. Blake takes over Batman, Wayne even gives him the information how to do it: when Blake picks Wayne up after his “bat” sports car is towed, Bruce says the Batman can be anybody, then in the alley where Blake is about to be shot in the face Batman saves him and tells him to wear a mask to protect those he loves, even in the end Wayne gives Blake the location of the Batcave. While not directly spelled out like a M. Bay film, to go on in debate that telling Blake to where a mask could mean anything pertaining to how to become a vigilante of sorts other than Batman would be ignorant to the various exposition given by Wayne him self through out the movie and lessens the ideology of Batman as a symbol set up over three films. Wayne flat out tells him Batman is a symbol not just a singular man. Robin? Nightwing? Nope, try the freaking BATMAN!

        • I’d like to think he’d add some of his own variation on it too.

          • For sure… maybe a voice similar to Kevin Conroy for starters… not that the Bale Batman voice was ubiquitously awful, just maybe lacking that subtle inflection his Wayne voice carried, (when it wasn’t doing a slight Keanu Reeves in the first film especially). Cheers!

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