Mark Ruffalo on Whether The Hulk Can Be Redeemed in ‘The Avengers 2′

Published 4 months ago by

The Hulk may be the strongest of The Avengers but he’s also the most unpredictable and uncontrollable, making him the most dangerous – in a bad way. We saw hints of this in The Avengers where he lost control on the S.H.I.E.L.D. Helicarrier and attacked Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) and it’s an issue that Dr. Bruce Banner (Mark Ruffalo) continually deals with in the comics.

Banner and The Hulk are both battling for control and despite Banner seemingly embracing the green beast for the climactic battle of New York at the end of The Avengers, and despite Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) expressing confidence in Banner’s wild side, Banner can never be fully in control. In the sequel, The Avengers: Age of  Ultron, Ultron aims to break the team, using a few super-powered individuals of his own and an army of robots, and it’s becoming increasingly likely that part of his plan – much like Loki’s last time – might be to turn the Hulk against the other heroes and potentially, innocent people.

Mark Ruffalo Hulk Movie Potential 1024x576 Mark Ruffalo on Whether The Hulk Can Be Redeemed in The Avengers 2

We saw the concept art where Iron Man’s Hulkbuster armor fought the Hulk and at Comic-Con over the weekend the first Avengers: Age of Ultron teaser trailer heavily emphasized Banner/Hulk seemingly losing control and fighting Iron Man. In our chat with Ruffalo after the Marvel Studios Comic-Con panel, he promised that fans will see more Hulk in the sequel and that “Hulk Hulks out more.”

“You’re gonna get a Hulk that’s meaner and more angry than you’ve ever seen.”

If Hulk is more “mean” and potentially less in control than ever before, is there redemption for that version of The Hulk? Our own Kofi Outlaw asked this to him on the Marvel SDCC press line:

“Uhhh… if you ask Banner I feel like he would tell you ‘no.’ There’s only so far that he could ever go before he feels like there’s no coming back and we might have crossed that threshold this time (laughs).”

Banner not forgiving his alter ego, the “other guy,” is a key point and story hint by Ruffalo…

NEXT PAGE: How This Could Setup Future Movies [Spoilers] >

« 1 2»

Get our free email alerts on the topics and author of this article:
TAGS: comic con 2014, planet hulk, the avengers, the avengers 2, the incredible hulk

82 Comments

Post a Comment

GravatarWant to change your avatar?
Go to Gravatar.com and upload your own (we'll wait)!

 Rules: No profanity or personal attacks.
 Use a valid email address or risk being banned from commenting.


If your comment doesn't show up immediately, it may have been flagged for moderation. Please try refreshing the page first, then drop us a note and we'll retrieve it.

  1. Honestly i didnt like the new hulk in this movie compared to the incredible hulk im talking bout the looks.this hulk looks like a big ape,fat,ugly.wished marvel could make him look like an incredible hulk that he is.just put the two hulks side by side and you’ll see how one hulk is way better looking than the other one

  2. Please seek a personal relationship with our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, the Son of God. For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. – John 3:16

    • Prophecies to Identify the Messiah, Which Jesus Does Not Fulfill:

      1) Matthew 1:23 says that Jesus (the messiah) would be called Immanuel, which means “God with us.” Yet no one, not even his parents, call him Immanuel at any point in the bible.

      2) The Messiah must be a physical descendant of David (Romans 1:3 & Acts 2:30). Yet, how could Jesus meet this requirement since his genealogies in Matthew 1 and Luke 3 show he descended from David through Joseph, who was not his natural father because of the Virgin Birth. Hence, this prophecy could not have been fulfilled.

      3) Isaiah 7:16 seems to say that before Jesus had reached the age of maturity, both of the Jewish countries would be destroyed. Yet there is no mention of this prophecy being fulfilled in the New Testament with the coming of Jesus, hence this is another Messiah prophecy not fulfilled.

      Prophecies Christians Use to Verify Jesus as the Messiah, Yet Clearly Fail:

      4) The gospels (especially Matthew 21:4 and John 12:14-15) claim that Jesus fulfills the prophecy of Zechariah 9:9. But the next few verses (Zechariah 9:10-13) show that the person referred to in this verse is a military king that would rule “from sea to sea”. Since Jesus had neither an army nor a kingdom, he could not have fulfilled this prophecy.

      5) Matthew (Matthew 2:17-18) quotes Jeremiah (Jeremiah 31:15), claiming that it was a prophecy of King Herod’s alleged slaughter of the children in and around Bethlehem after the birth of Jesus. But this passage refers to the Babylonian captivity, as is clear by reading the next two verses (Jeremiah 31:16-17), and, thus, has nothing to do with Herod’s massacre.

      6) John 19:33 says that during Jesus’ crucifixion, the soldiers didn’t break his legs because he was already dead. Verse John 19:36 claims that this fulfilled a prophecy: “Not a bone of him shall be broken.” But there is no such prophecy. It is sometimes said that the prophecy appears in Exodus 12:46, Numbers 9:12 & Psalm 34:20. This is not correct. Exodus 12:46 & Numbers 9:12 are not prophecies, they are commandments. The Israelites are told not to break the bones of the Passover lamb, and this is all it is about. And Psalm 34:20 seems to refer to righteous people in general (see verse Psalm 34:19, where a plural is used), not to make a prophecy about a specific person.

      7) “When Israel was a child, then I loved him, and called my son out of Egypt.” Hosea 11:1. Matthew (Matthew 2:15) claims that the flight of Jesus’ family to Egypt is a fulfillment of this verse. But Hosea 11:1 is not a prophecy at all. It is a reference to the Hebrew exodus from Egypt and has nothing to do with Jesus. Matthew tries to hide this fact by quoting only the last part of the verse (“Out of Egypt I have called my son”).

      8) “But thou, Bethlehem Ephratah, though thou be little among the thousands of Judah, yet out of thee shall he come forth unto me that is to be ruler in Israel; whose goings forth have been from of old, from everlasting.” Micah 5:2 The gospel of Matthew (Matthew 2:5-6) claims that Jesus’ birth in Bethlehem fulfils this prophecy. But this is unlikely for two reasons.

      A) “Bethlehem Ephratah” in Micah 5:2 refers not to a town, but to a clan: the clan of Bethlehem, who was the son of Caleb’s second wife, Ephrathah (1 Chronicles 2:18, 2:50-52 & 4:4).

      B) The prophecy (if that is what it is) does not refer to the Messiah, but rather to a military leader, as can be seen from Micah 5:6. This leader is supposed to defeat the Assyrians, which, of course, Jesus never did. It should also be noted that Matthew altered the text of Micah 5:2 by saying: “And thou Bethlehem, in the land of Judah” rather than “Bethlehem Ephratah” as is said in Micah 5:2. He did this, intentionally no doubt, to make this verse appear to refer to the town of Bethlehem rather than the family clan.