Despite the fact that shooting is already underway on Marc Webb’s upcoming Spider-Man reboot, Sony has kept most details close to the vest (or spider-suit).

But Social Network star, Andrew Garfield couldn’t let his co-star, Emma Stone, be the only one spilling the beans about the next Spider-Man franchise installment.

The Guardian caught up with Garfield for their Film Weekly podcast (which you can listen to HERE), and managed to get the reluctant star to reveal a few, albeit, vague details about the Spider-Man reboot as well as his feelings about getting to play a super-hero:

“I’m going to have to hibernate into this character for at least four or five months. I feel like a kid in my pyjamas. I can only say how it feels and it feels pretty special. It feels like a dream realized and a fantasy realized. Again, I don’t take it lightly and I feel incredibly lucky that I get to wear spandex for the next couple of months.”

As for how Garfield intends to actually approach the character, both physically and mentally:

“I think Spider-Man needs strength, but Peter Parker is still a teenager, you know? That’s a very tender balance to figure out. It’s very specific what we’re trying to achieve in terms of body type and the feeling of that. Rest assured, there’s a lot of people helping me with that because I have no discipline in that respect. My father’s a swimming coach and I kind of rebelled against that very early on. Any kind of exercise routine has to be cracked with a pretty firm whip.”

Despite speculation that Spider-Man could be an entirely digital character, like Cameron’s Na’vi, it sounds like we might get to see Garfield don a slim, spandex, spider-suit after all.

The focus on a lean, but still powerful, Parker is a welcome addition to a film genre filled with overstuffed muscle-men. Certainly Chris Hemsworth and Chris Evans had to bulk up for the parts of Thor and Captain America, respectively, but their transformations are a bit scary.

Garfield’s comments also show an appreciation and care for the role of Peter Park and his web slinging alter-ego that should help dispel some fear over the High School backdrop for Webb’s reboot.

Die-hard Spider-fans, as well as Twi-haters, have raised justifiable concern that the Spider-Man reboot could be too melodramatic – to appeal to the hordes of supernatural-teen-drama fans (the ones who line-up days in advance for Twilight and Harry Potter). While Sony is undoubtedly hoping to snag that demographic, it’s hard to imagine an intelligent filmmaker like Webb – as well as seasoned stars, such as Garfield and Emma Stone, dumbing the picture down.

In addition to Garfield’s comments, we’ve also got an updated report regarding when Marc Webb and his team might be web-swinging to a city near you.

Here are the latest Spider-Man reboot shooting details (courtesy of the Los Angeles Times):

  • The Spider-Man reboot will employ nearly 1,000 crew members.
  • The production is taking up seven stages on the Sony Pictures lot.
  • On-location filming locations used so far include Henry Fonda Theater in Hollywood and Immanuel Presbyterian Church in mid-Wilshire.
  • Production will include two weeks in New York but the bulk of filming will occur in Los Angeles on the Sony lot and various locations around town, from South Pasadena to San Pedro to Woodland Hills.

Regarding the amount of Los Angeles shoots, compared to New York (Spider-Man’s actual hometown), Sony Pictures Entertainment spokesman Steve Elzer reminds fans that Raimi’s Spider-Man films were also shot in Los Angeles:

“This is the fourth Spider-Man production we have shot primarily in Los Angeles and for good reason. The crews here are the best in the world but there is a comfort level in producing a project of this size and scope on your own backlot.”

Given Raimi’s success at capturing New York in his Spider-Man trilogy, there’s no reason to think that Webb will have any problem doing the same. Though, it’ll certainly be interesting to see where the director choose to film in NYC.

Follow us on Twitter @benkendrick and @screenrant and let us know what you think.

Sources: The GuardianLos Angeles Times