Onlookers had a party, snapping up pictures left and right during The Amazing Spider-Man shoot in Los Angeles and New York earlier this year. However, things have been relatively quiet since then, with respect to the iconic web-slinger’s cinematic reboot.

A teaser trailer for Spidey’s new movie is the next big must-see item on the agenda, but in the meantime, an interview between Collider and Amazing Spider-Man co-screenwriter Steve Kloves offers some tasty nuggets of information about the film’s more grounded tone and creative 3D action.

Kloves is best known for his work on the Harry Potter series, having scripted all but the fifth film in that literature-turned-movie franchise. With Spider-Man, though, he had both the original comic books and a “bible” of elements that Marvel encouraged him to incorporate into the script (including the artificial web shooters).

While the screenwriter voices his admiration for Sam Raimi having struck an effectively cartoony tone with his Spider-Man trilogy, Kloves also admitted to Collider that was never his plan with Amazing Spider-Man:

“I said [to Marvel], ‘I can’t do ‘shazam!’ dialogue, that’s not what I do. If you wanna do the Peter Parker I knew as a kid reading the comic book, I can do that, because it was grounded in exactly what you said, reality.’ So they said ‘Yes that’s what we want, we want you to come in and write Peter Parker as a real character’… So I don’t know how this is gonna turn out, but I wrote this very, very naturalistically. A lot of humor, but naturalistic humor, not jokes.”

Emo Peter: One of least-liked attempts at humor in Raimi's Spider-Man movies.

Just about every upcoming comic book movie on the horizon is playing up its merits as a “gritty and grounded” take on its respective source material, but early signs indicate that could actually be the case with The Amazing Spider-Man. Going off amateur set photos of Andrew Garfield as Peter Parker and Emma Stone as Gwen Stacy, in their casual wear, the two look much more like authentic teens living in contemporary New York than Tobey Maguire and Kirsten Dunst as Peter and Mary Jane ever did in Raimi’s Spider-Man trilogy.

That’s not to mention, the Spidey reboot will also integrate live-action wire-work with CGI-enhanced footage of the hero swinging around the metropolitan landscape, in the hopes of making it seem all the more convincing and realistic.

On that note: Kloves had the following to offer, in terms of how director Marc Webb is attempting to make the action in Amazing Spider-Man more involving – with the assistance of 3D elements:

“… What impressed me about Mark Webb’s pre-vises was that they were really coherent, you could follow the action. There’s sometimes guys who do that stuff and it’s like eye-candy, but you have no idea what you’re watching. With this, what I saw in the pre-vises, Mark had designed it in such a way that you were really following Spider-Man as he was engaging in these action sequences, and it made it much more thrilling because you felt you were with him… Mark was really, really schooling himself in the 3D of it all. He wanted to really shoot the movie in sort of pure 3D. I think he wanted to try and do it in a very sophisticated way.”

Since Kloves says he worked primarily on character development and dialogue for The Amazing Spider-Man, it’s all the more assuring to hear him talk about striking a more naturalistic tone with his script work. While a lot of fans certainly like Raimi’s Spider-Man for its occasionally cheesy dialogue and conversations, there are also definitely a lot of people who could do without the groan-inducing one-liners (“I think I have a superhero stalker”, anyone?). So the reboot at least has that – and the promise of cool 3D Spidey action – going for it.

The Amazing Spider-Man will swing into theaters on July 3rd, 2012.

For more from Kloves, check out the full interview over at Collider.