Following the release of The Amazing Spider-Man teaser trailer, many movie-fans were mixed about the last thirty seconds of the sneak peek – which featured first-person shots of parkour traversal and web-slinging.

Instead of the swooping first person web-swinning shots in Sam Raimi’s original Spider-Man trilogy, Marc Webb’s Amazing Spider-Man reboot features the wall-crawler’s flailing arms and legs as he jumps rooftops and clambers across the side of buildings. It was a fun introduction to the new installment – but how much of the frantic first person action will be in the actual film?

As mentioned, Sam Raimi’s original Spider-Man trilogy was known for zip-lining cameras above New York City streets, to immerse viewers in what it’s like to be the famous wall-crawler, but Webb appears poised to take the idea up a notch with “Spidey-Vision” – in the interest of creating a new 3D experience.

Speaking at Comic Con 2011, Webb clarified the vision behind the 3D first person shots in The Amazing Spider-Man:

“Because we’re shooting in 3D, I wanted to conceive of certain things very specifically for 3D. There’s an experiential component to 3D that’s fascinating and we’re experimenting with generating that point of view – so you feel what Peter Parker feels, you feel what Spider-Man feels when he’s jumping over buildings and over the streets, that sort of thing. But we made a very, and Andrew had to pay the price for this, very conscious effort to ground stunts. We had an incredible stunt team put together. We built this whole rig hundreds of feet long over Riverside Drive in Harlem and we swung a man through traffic down the street. Andy Armstrong also built a car rig with a series of wires, incredibly complicated and really a beautiful contraption to help do those effects practically and that was really exciting and exhilirating to explore – and not to mention an incredible wealth of acrobatics.”

Unfortunately, Webb’s comments were somewhat cut-off by a phone call (on a reporter’s phone that was being used as a voice recorder) that interrupted the press panel – and was humorously answered by Peter Parker himself, Andrew Garfield – so the director didn’t get a chance to clarify how many first person perspective shots of Spider-Man’s redesigned costume we’ll be seeing in the final film.

No doubt it’ll be a tricky balance because, while the footage was enjoyable in the teaser trailer, it could be overly-disorienting and frantic for some moviegoers (think the shaky cam footage in Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen) – as well as flat-out nauseating for others. That said, the big screen 3D version of the footage at the Sony Comic Con panel was definitely convincing – if used in smart moderation.

Follow me on Twitter @benkendrick — and let us know how much Spidey-Vision footage you’d like to see in the final film.

The Amazing Spider-Man swings into theaters on July 3, 2012.